DNS explained for people, who have no technical knowledge

The internet spans the earth... (PresseBox) ( Koeln, )
We all know that in the world of domain names today, the presence of the  domain name system is very much significant. It is interesting to know that the acronym DNS actually stands for Domain Name System/Service/Server. However, I will be using the term DNS for the domain name system to provide you with a clear knowledge about the meaning of this particular thing.

The DNS  is actually a powerful tool that contributes a great part in the domain name process. It is often described as an internet service that translates or transforms the domain names into an IP or Internet Protocol address like 64.434.234.1.

"Most prominently," Wikipedia says, the DNS "translates more readily memorized domain names to the numerical IP addresses needed for locating and identifying computer services and devices with the underlying network protocols. By providing a worldwide, distributed directory service, the Domain Name System has been an essential component of the functionality of the Internet since 1985."

Aside from knowing such basic function of the DNS, it is also interesting to learn that a basic possession of the DNS is caching. This property takes place in situations when a server welcomes information about a mapping, it caches that information. Therefore, with such function, a later question for similar mapping can use the cached output, and will not result to additional questions to other servers. And generally, the DNS dapplies the caching to optimize the cost of the search. But how does the DNS caching works?

In terms of caching, it is very nice to know that every server has a cache for currently applied names along with records of where the mapping data for a particular name was taken. So when a particular client is asking the server to determine a certain domain name, the DNS  then does check if it has the power for a domain name, and if it does, the system doesn’t need to cache the information. However, if it has no authority for a domain name, the DNS  then checks its cache whether the domain name has been resolved currently, and if yes, the DNS reports the caching data to its clients.

There are some instances that the DNS cache can be examined when the system cached the data once, but didn’t adjust it. Due to the reason that the information about a certain domain name can be changed, the server may have inaccurate data in its caching table. There is a certain value known as the Time to Live or known as TTL which is applied when to age the information. So whenever an authority responds to a request for a domain name, it then involves a Time to Live value in the answer which indicates how long it assures the binding to linger.

Hans-Peter Oswald

http://www.domainregistry.de/...

http://www.com-domains.com

http://www.domainregisty.de
Für die oben stehenden Pressemitteilungen, das angezeigte Event bzw. das Stellenangebot sowie für das angezeigte Bild- und Tonmaterial ist allein der jeweils angegebene Herausgeber (siehe Firmeninfo bei Klick auf Bild/Meldungstitel oder Firmeninfo rechte Spalte) verantwortlich. Dieser ist in der Regel auch Urheber der Pressetexte sowie der angehängten Bild-, Ton- und Informationsmaterialien.
Die Nutzung von hier veröffentlichten Informationen zur Eigeninformation und redaktionellen Weiterverarbeitung ist in der Regel kostenfrei. Bitte klären Sie vor einer Weiterverwendung urheberrechtliche Fragen mit dem angegebenen Herausgeber. Bei Veröffentlichung senden Sie bitte ein Belegexemplar an service@pressebox.de.